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Welcome home

Personal Reflection

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It was the second day at my new job as the administrative assistant for Denver Metro Family Services. I have to admit, I was feeling a little lost in my new surroundings, maybe even to the point of being afraid. After all, here I was, in a new city with a new job, new boss, new responsibilities (not even sure what was expected of me), new car (I hoped it wouldn’t break down) and new house. I was feeling really insecure. I didn’t have most of my belongings, a checking account, credit card, cell phone, doctors, or any of the things that made me feel secure before I moved.

On this second day, I went with other staff members to the Crossroads, an Army-run homeless shelter for men, to host a tour of the newly renovated facility for a group of local leaders. I went, greeted our guests, and tried to act like I knew what it was all about.

There are three levels of shelter at the center. There is a big room where men sleep on mats on the floor. These men have wandered in from the streets, or have just been picked up in our severe weather “Search and Rescue” program. The second level of shelter consists of rows of beds with low wooden dividers. These beds also have storage lockers and drawers under them. The third level of shelter is upstairs and is made up of small individual rooms, where a man can have more space and privacy. Each level requires more commitment on the part of the individual served.

After the tour was over, I walked around the second level of shelter, still feeling “out of it.” There I saw something that completely changed my perspective about my new situation. By the bed, the resident had placed a large floor mat. In bold letters it read, “WELCOME HOME.” I was humbled and a little ashamed of myself for feeling the way I had. This homeless man was so grateful for so little, while I had been so ungrateful for so much.

John 14:23 says: “…If anyone loves me, he will obey my teaching. My Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our home with him.”

The truth is, it doesn’t matter where my earthly home is. What does matter is that Christ has made his “home” in me.

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