Reality…

From the desk of…

by Sharron Hudson, Major –

There is a Scottish proverb that says, “Open confession is good for the soul.” So here goes: Hi, my name is Sharron, and I watch reality shows. Yes, I can hear you, “Hi Sharron.” Not all reality shows, mind you, because they are too numerous to count. How many reality fashion makeover, house makeover, family and pet behavior or competing chef shows do we need? And I say “no” to the embarrassing ones like “Mama’s Boy”—give me a break! You will be happy to know that I only watch the ones that have some redeeming value to them—really!

My favorite is “The Biggest Loser,” perhaps because I have struggled with weight issues all of my life. It is very inspiring as I sit on my sofa and watch the contestants sweat and almost die on those treadmills! Anyway, I really have learned much by watching this show and am doing pretty well on my own “wellness program.” But that’s a subject for another day.

What makes us desire to look into the “real” lives of other people? Why are these shows so popular? Are our lives so boring that we have to watch others going through their own struggles, victories and sorrow? Don’t we have enough to worry about without getting so personally involved with the latest person crying on our flat screen televisions? And yes—another confession—I have cried, too, especially on the episode when “Grandpa” got voted out because he “was not the Biggest Loser!”

For some reason humankind, throughout the ages (e.g. Roman Coliseum, Greek tragedies, soap operas, romance novels), have found it entertaining to watch or read about others who face difficulties or embarrassing situations in their lives. In some cases we’re puffed up and say, “I’m glad I’m not like that person,” or “What are they thinking? I would never do that!” Or, on the other hand, jealously we may say, “I wish I could win that much money” or “Why can’t I look as good as they do?”

DOSE OF REALITY…

Since my walk across an Oakland auditorium platform in 1975 to receive my commission, I have learned something from the “real world” of my life in Christ and service to others. I commend those who daily bring hope, life and love to a hurting, dying world:

· A faithful Salvationist who visits the lonely in a nursing home, prison cell or veteran’s hospital…

· An officer and good friend suffering the relentless disease of cancer but still loves the Lord and gives encouragement to all those surrounding her…

· A young adult spending his or her time unselfishly with at risk children rather than socializing with friends…

· Corps officers who, 24/7, reach out to their community, doing the best they can with God’s help, with this daunting task…

· Employees who, because they believe in the mission and ministry of The Salvation Army, still come to the office even though they may be able to earn more money in another place…

· Young Salvationists who want to make a difference in their world, who give up a summer or a few years to serve human need in a country and culture they know nothing about…

What will matter at the end of our personal “reality show?” Faith, hope, love. A life given unselfishly as God has given to us. As we enter into the Lord’s presence what will be our reward? No prize is worth more than to have him say to us: “Well done, good and faithful servant! You have been faithful with a few things; I will put you in charge of many things. Come and share your master’s happiness!” That’s reality!


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Change we can believe in

Change we can believe in

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The faith of our father

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