Biblical Creation: An Illustrated Autobiography

Review_BiblicalCreation“There is a picture set into the words” begins Georgann Chenault’s recently published work, Biblical Creation: An Illustrated Autobiography. Through over 25 years of research, Chenault demonstrates through computer diagrammatic constructs how the numbers, days and dates listed in Scripture reinforce one another to form perfectly overlapping illustrations. Taking her readers through a breathtaking step-by-step process of her well studied journey, she shows how the genealogy of Jesus, through Mary, mirrors the diagram for creation and places the Lord’s birth at the very center of it all, with the cross linking man’s history to God’s ultimate redemption plan.

One Chenault’s most interesting conclusions is the idea that the days of Genesis may not span seven literal 24-hour units of time as we associate with the account today. Building from the metaphysical theory that time isn’t linear, she diagrammatically finds evidence that the days are mere representations of specific ongoing works of God spanning all the way to the end of time itself.  The implications of this fluid theory based upon the sequences revealed to us link together every section of Scripture into one luxuriant construct, proving that God who is outside of time had foreknowledge of his plan for today and tomorrow even from the very beginning.

Mesmerized by how Chenault’s diagrams for each section of Scripture fit perfectly into her original diagrammatic structure for the creation account, I wrote to her and asked if the breath of her work in diagram was contingent upon her opening model for creation. And if they are contingent upon the opening model, could there be other models within the text that could equally represent the continuity and validate her correlations? “I cannot imagine it,” she wrote back, noting that so much depends upon her original foundation of elementary symbols that it would be near impossible to construct the complex diagram overlays later presented in this work.

“I realized it was highly unlikely much of this later work could be done without a computer,” she wrote. “I now consider this entire endeavor a ‘just in time’ discovery process and can only wonder how many other people are also working on seeing the Bible in this fashion.”

I have found myself in awe with Scripture in my own studies over the years, and agree with Chenault that there is a beautifully complex weave behind the words which give evidence of its divine authority. Many have drawn conclusions based upon the thought provoking study of biblical numerology, and many have claimed to have unlocked the definitive foundational pattern to it all. But after having spent many hours studying Chenault’s work and choosing to see things from her perspective, I hold onto a healthy skepticism that this is truly the initial framework that the whole biblical structure is built upon.

If all of the diagrammatic representations in this work find their origins to one initial root structure, I’d assume there would be more corroboration from outside influence to validate their objective truth. What I find instead, is corroboration from within a single train of diagrammatic progression, built from an initial presupposition that we have to assume is valid if we’re to move on through Chenault’s theory. So my recommendation?  If you’re into this kind of stuff like I am, pick up this book, give it a read, and judge for yourself.  In an age of self-help spiritual literature, it’s an increasing rarity to read works by those who truly pour themselves into the complexities of Scripture.